tribslooger
tribslooger:

Democlawcy: Now with even more choice!First off, sorry about the really cheesy pun. I did hesitate about putting it in, but bad wordplay is still wordplay I suppose. Hopefully everyone is well aware of the protests for democracy happening right now in Hong Kong (If not, you can read this - it explains the situation quite well). In essence: Hong Kong, once a British colony, was handed over to China with the deal of being able to more or less continue to have a degree of autonomy in how things are run (for 50 years, at least on paper that is). Recently Hong Kongers have been pushing for universal suffrage (the ability to elect their own leader, i.e. chief executive), but Beijing rules this out and decides that instead, yes, Hong Kong can have ‘democracy’, but it has to be the ‘right sort’. What happens is that rules are drawn up stating that candidates for the position have to first get over the hurdle of being nominated by a committee (and who knows what kind of people make up this group), thus essentially nullifying the whole point of voting.So we get to choose who becomes the next chief executive from a preselected pool of people who have ticked all of Beijing’s criteria boxes? No wonder the people are protesting…albeit peacefully.

tribslooger:

Democlawcy: Now with even more choice!

First off, sorry about the really cheesy pun. I did hesitate about putting it in, but bad wordplay is still wordplay I suppose.

Hopefully everyone is well aware of the protests for democracy happening right now in Hong Kong (If not, you can read this - it explains the situation quite well). In essence: Hong Kong, once a British colony, was handed over to China with the deal of being able to more or less continue to have a degree of autonomy in how things are run (for 50 years, at least on paper that is). Recently Hong Kongers have been pushing for universal suffrage (the ability to elect their own leader, i.e. chief executive), but Beijing rules this out and decides that instead, yes, Hong Kong can have ‘democracy’, but it has to be the ‘right sort’. What happens is that rules are drawn up stating that candidates for the position have to first get over the hurdle of being nominated by a committee (and who knows what kind of people make up this group), thus essentially nullifying the whole point of voting.

So we get to choose who becomes the next chief executive from a preselected pool of people who have ticked all of Beijing’s criteria boxes? No wonder the people are protesting…albeit peacefully.

mikaela-maki

mikaela-maki:

Mong Kok was in chaos this afternoon when a bunch of blue ribbon pro-Beijing supporters attacked protesters.

protesters are beaten, girls are being sexually harassed, tents and materials are being destroyed. and yet the police did nothing to stop them.

How is it fair when protesters did nothing and got pepper spray and tear gas in return when those who use violence on others were being protected and escorted to leave the scene? 

I am truly shaken by the fact that those blue ribbon people lost their humanity and conscience, and have the heart to use violence on the protesters. Many of them are only students. 

Is this the ideal city you want your children to live in? when the good are bullied and the bad are protected? where is justice?

#hk

thisisfusion

thisisfusion:

More than 100 young people gathered in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday to show solidarity with pro-democracy demonstrators in Hong Kong.

The peaceful crowd sang “Do You Hear the People Sing” from Les Miserables and chanted calls for open elections on the steps of the Hong Kong Economic and Trade Institute before moving to Lafayette Square in front of the White House.

They tied yellow ribbons – a symbol of the pro-democracy movement – on each other and on nearby railings.

Photos by Nicole Toczauer for Fusion.

bloombergphotos

bloombergphotos:

New Era of Civil Disobedience                              

Anti-government activists gather during a protest in Hong Kong, China, late Saturday and in the early morning hours of Sunday, Sept. 28, 2014. 

Pro-democracy protesters kick-started an occupation of central Hong Kong after students clashed with the city’s police, prompting thousands of people to take to the streets in support. 

China said last month that candidates for the 2017 leadership election must be vetted by a committee, angering pro-democracy campaigners who say the group is packed with business executives and lawmakers who favor Beijing. 

Read more from the report by Bloomberg News

Full coverage of the Hong Kong protest movement by the Bloomberg Photo team here.

Photographer: Lam Yik Fei/Bloomberg     

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